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In search of the quarterback....

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Evan Habeeb-USA TODAY Sports

The Titans have had two rookie quarterback since I started this blog.  My first season was 2006.  The blog started right before Vince Young took over as the starter during that season.  Things have changed a lot since then, but if you were around here back then, you know how badly I wanted VY to succeed.

In fact, I was all in after his rookie year.  I hung on every positive thing he did in a football game- even when the negative things he was doing were far outweighing the positives.  "But look at this throw, or this play" I would say as proof that Vince would eventually be a good quarterback.

That went south, and the Titans turned to Jake Locker a few years later.  I was, and still am, in love with Jake Locker the person as a quarterback.  He has all of the traits you want in your quarterback from a personality standpoint.  The same cycle happened with Jake that it did with Vince.  I tried to hang on to the glimpses of positive that I saw all the while ignoring the negative.

I remember thinking one day, while watching the beat reporters tweet out Jake Locker's numbers from a training camp practice, "I bet the beat writers in Green Bay don't tweet out Aaron Rodgers's numbers from a training camp practice."  I should have been smart enough to figure out right then that Locker wasn't the guy.

This line of thinking started earlier today when I saw these Tweets from Rivers McCown earlier today:

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p>I think approaching the quarterback position with skepticism rather than optimism leads to better evaluations. Thoughts?</p>&mdash; Rivers McCown (@riversmccown) <a href="https://twitter.com/riversmccown/status/531886713795133442">November 10, 2014</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p>It feels like it&#39;s really commonplace to say a quarterback has &quot;promise&quot; on one or two throws, then overlook a lot of glaring flaws.</p>&mdash; Rivers McCown (@riversmccown) <a href="https://twitter.com/riversmccown/status/531887089504096257">November 10, 2014</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p>... And then it&#39;s easy to use that &quot;promise&quot; to overpromote a quarterback&#39;s chances of improvement. It&#39;s a really silly cycle. That&#39;s all.</p>&mdash; Rivers McCown (@riversmccown) <a href="https://twitter.com/riversmccown/status/531888231042666497">November 10, 2014</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p>(I do wonder how much of the &quot;promise&quot; trap occurs because of what I&#39;d term the prevalent coach mindset of &quot;we can correct _____&quot;)</p>&mdash; Rivers McCown (@riversmccown) <a href="https://twitter.com/riversmccown/status/531892328055570432">November 10, 2014</a></blockquote>

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Your thoughts?